Saturday, May 29, 2010

Les jours se suivent et ne se ressemblent pas

An old French proverb that means, roughly, every day is different. And I suppose it's true, except when it's not. Last week we enjoyed several days of sunny warm weather. The weather is changing now and temperatures have been more spring-like than summer-like. Which is normal for this time of year. But it's funny how a few really nice days can spoil you to the point that you're disappointed when they're gone.

A weathered old grape vine trunk lying in the vineyard.

We are expecting rain over the next day or two and that's a good thing all around because, so far, it's been a pretty dry couple of months. In fact, we've had less than average rainfall since January. We have a rain gauge in the back yard and I record every rainfall, and have since 2004. Excel spreadsheets are so useful, aren't they?

The garden will enjoy a couple of days of gentle rain, as long as they're followed by some warm sunny days. I suppose I should get the eggplant seedlings out there today so they can take advantage of the free water. I do have fabric tunnels to protect them if it gets too chilly. But I could also just move them out into the rain in their cold frame.

I'll see how lazy I feel later on today. I need to decide if I'm going to the market in town this morning for more asparagus and/or strawberries and anything else. And then there's tennis to watch. There are several good matches scheduled for today at Roland Garros.

6 comments:

  1. There's a joke in French about that proverb.
    Here it is: "Un ours blanc suivait un ours noir, moralité, les ours se suivent et ne se ressemblent pas."
    It is a play on pronunciation. Supposedly, the plural of ours is spelled the same way, but the final 's' is silent, whereas it is not in the singular. So ours in the plural is close enough to jours.

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  2. chm, that's a good one :) Plus, I had not the foggiest idea that the plural ours had an s muet.

    Walt, these are nice things to have to ponder, aren't they? "Shall I go to the cute little market in my cute little French town this morning?" "Shall I partake of more uber-fresh, locally grown veggies and fruits?" "Shall I enjoy tennis on the tv?"

    Very nice, indeed :)

    Judy

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  3. Roll on reitrement, eh? But I can't complain - it may be yet another Bank Holiday weekend where it rains most of the time, but I'm posting this from a pub with free wifi, a nice pint of beer and a sandwich beside me....

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  4. Judy, I said supposedly, because in reality most people, if not all, pronounce the plural the same as the singular, i.e. with a voiced 's'. I wonder if that special pronunciation was not established in order to differentiate the genders in the plural form, des ours and des ourses. Who knows? It is now obsolete.

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  5. If you moved that grape vine trunk to a sandy place, it would look like driftwood.

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  6. chm, ah, ces français et leurs jeux de mots...

    judy, only we don't say "uber" in France. Not since the war...

    autolycus, sounds good. Now if only they had Roland Garros on the telly...

    starman, there's some sand down by the river; I could try it...

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