Thursday, April 14, 2011

Le couvreur

The roofer. This guy has been working on our neighbors' house for a week or so now. He's installing Velux windows, those typically French roof windows you see all over the place. We had two put in our house last summer, but not by a professional roofer.

A local roofer installing the second of at least three roof windows on a neighbor's house.

We still don't think our leak problem has been solved. But it hasn't rained much in the last two months so we don't really know. After the next rain, if we still have the water incursion, we will call in a roofer to remove the tiles around the window and see what's going on. This guy is a candidate for the job.

If you don't remember, the drywall around the base of the new windows becomes slightly wet when it rains. The windows themselves are not leaking, but somehow water is getting in under the exterior flanges and wicking into the drywall. No damage yet, except for a little staining. But we'd like this fixed.

Our original contractor has applied some sealant outside, but we're not convinced. Again, we need a good rainstorm to test it out.

11 comments:

  1. Oh my, French Laborers. Now this Blog is getting hot!
    m.

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  2. A word of advice from someone who knows what she talking about ... Don't let the problem get out of hand. I wouldn't want you having to move the way I had because of the invading damp! :(

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  3. If you have wet drywall, you have a problem. My suggestion is get it looked at now. Why wait until you really have a lot of water? Since you are having dry weather now, the repairman can use a hose or a garden container to pour a heavy amount of water over the outside of the skylight and determine where the problem is, then fix it while you have good weather.

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  4. It would seem they didn't seal around the windows after putting them in.

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  5. Walt, if you look at the chimney in the photo you took you will see a lead flashing round the base and roof side... your Velux should have the same... it should run from under the tiles above, round both sides and over the tiles below. The window should be installed over this and a further strip placed round the installed window and going UP inside the outer frame. Sealant is placed between the two... and between the final strip and the wood of the inner frame.
    And Mary is right... get it fixed now! And the plaster in the drywall IS being damaged every time it gets damp!!

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  6. Walt,
    I had oneof those Velux 'roof windows' (we call them 'skylights' here in the States) at my old house in Pennsylvania. I miss it terribly. I hope you get your leak fixed soon. I know how annoying it is to have a leak every time it rains. You can't enjoy the pitter patter of rain on your room because you know what's coming.

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  7. Seconding what Tim and Mary said. Evem if you can't see obvious water damage, it's there. Do not let it get worse. Mold in walls is not something you want to deal with -- very bad for health. And we'd hate to lose you and your wonderful photos. :-)

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  8. we have a leak in the roof; it is getting old and I am ready to take gas. I want this fixed by the rainy season or i will be quite cross.

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  9. mark, just for you.

    martine, we're working on it.

    mary, yes, I agree.

    starman, not sure. French roofs are put together differently from American roofs.

    tim, yes, all the appropriate flashing is in place, at least on the outside. A roofer will need to take the tiles of and verify.

    ron, I know!

    emm, we're on it!

    michael, good luck!

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  10. Hey Walt, did you already have that drywall fixed? I think it's time you call in a more reliable roofer to do the job. The roofer in the picture, he seems to look like someone who knows how to do the job well and an expert in his craft.

    Nuri R.

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  11. Whoa - That is one high place you'll never find me standing on! I'm not really the DIY-type, but I want to at least suggest it - - I mean, you don't need to hire a roofer just to check why won't the drywall stop from leaking, right? Hmmm, but then again, nothing beats the work of an old professional :P Anyways, it's your call. Good luck with your leak problem!

    Max. B.

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