Sunday, June 10, 2012

Eglise Saint-Edouard

This is the third and last church that Ken and I visited on this trip. We pretty much just stumbled upon it while driving through some residential neighborhoods near Montréal's Little Italy. Saint-Edouard fronts on the rue Saint-Denis near the Beaubien métro stop.

The plaque on the front of the church. The parish was founded in 1895.

The church was completed in 1909, making it the more recent of the three we saw. The impressive spires rise sixty-four meters above the neighborhood, their oxidized copper cladding showing green against a bright blue sky on the day we were there. The church was built with locally quarried limestone.

The impressive facade of St.-Edouard.

The church's bells were manufactured in the Haute-Savoie region of France and installed in the bell towers in 1922. And the organ was built in 1913. In fact, the organ was being played when we walked into the church; the organist was practicing the familiar wedding march. Apparently the church is a popular setting for weddings.

The organ in the northern transept. Can you spot the organist?

The organ music was accompanied by the hum of a vacuum cleaner. A member of the church staff was cleaning a carpet in front of the altar. Since it was Saturday morning, I wonder if they were preparing for a wedding that day?

Ceiling detail in St.-Edouard.

We probably spent about twenty minutes wandering around inside and outside taking pictures before getting back in the car. I had seen a market on our street map and thought it would be fun to check out, so we headed there next.

A not-so-centered photo of the altar and choir of St.-Edouard.

12 comments:

  1. It is beautiful and what an experience listening to that organ. Diane

    ReplyDelete
  2. I love the star spangled neo-Gothic painted ceiling!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Your photos remind me that there are beautiful churches to see in North America. This one is lovely. The wedding march and a vacuum cleaner-lol.

    ReplyDelete
  4. That is one I haven't seen yet... And I should have! :) But considering the number of curches in Montreal, I wonder if it's possible to visit them all!

    Gorgeous photos!

    Hugs
    Jon

    ReplyDelete
  5. What a gorgeous church, superb photos.
    Been looking forward to seeing pics
    of that market you both blogged about.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Are you starting to feel that every time you two walk into a church, the wedding march will be playing? It can't be coincidence.

    In my limited experience, the wedding march is followed too soon by the sound of a vacuum cleaner. That's when you know the honeymoon is over.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Beautiful ceiling. There doesn't seem to be much stained glass, is there a reason?

    ReplyDelete
  8. Haaa haaaaa Carolyn *R*R*R*R*

    Walt, what does it mean, then, that the church was "consacrée en... 1945"? Does that mean that they used it from 1909 without it being official, or something?

    ReplyDelete
  9. Again, I love the architecture but not the reason for it.

    ReplyDelete
  10. What a bright and beautiful church... Yes, I can see the organist but do not see the vacuumist - hahah!

    Bises,
    Genie

    ReplyDelete
  11. oh a 'proper' church - looks lovely
    Do people go to Mass any, in France?

    ReplyDelete
  12. diane, we certainly weren't expecting that!

    susan, I thought the stars were neat!

    evelyn, we're very often not tourists where we spend most of our time, but it's worth it to look a little closer.

    jon, just the big ones, lol!

    sheila, market photos on Monday. :)

    carolyn, lol!

    gaynor, if there is, I don't know it.

    judy, hmmmm, it must be something like that. I don't know much about how the Catholics do things.

    starman, yup.

    genie, she's there somewhere!

    michael, yes they do, but not in great numbers. Mostly on Christmas and Easter.

    ReplyDelete

Pour your heart out! I'm listening.