Tuesday, June 12, 2012

More from the market

I don't have much more to say about the Marché Jean-Talon, so I'll just share a few more pictures.

Tomatoes from Ontario, $2.00 (Canadian) per basket. So perfectly arranged!

Poires (pears)!

Aubergines (eggplant) and poivrons rouges (red chili peppers).

Baskets and bags of pommes de terre (potatoes) grown in Québec.

Italian plum tomatoes imported from Mexico.

Bunches of asperges vertes (green asparagus).

Haricots (beans), carottes (carrots), et champignons (mushrooms).

Miel (honey), vinaigre de cidre (cider vinegar), et pollen (bee pollen).

Citrons verts (limes) et tomates cerises (cherry tomatoes).

Are you as hungry as I am, yet?

13 comments:

  1. Yes!!
    Great set of pix, Walt...
    markets in the UK have started to use the "price per basket" system... I haven't noticed it here, though.
    Tim [on Pauline's machine]

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  2. nah

    It's all vegitibbles. Vegitibbles is what food eats.

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  3. WOW, what gorgeous photos of gorgeous produce!!

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  4. Whenever I go at Jean-Talon, it ends up costing me a fortune, not only because of those gorgeous fruit and vegetable stands but also all the little boutiques around the market, spices from all over the world at La Dépense, Les Sucreries de l'érable where they make some awesome maple syrup pies and other sweets to die for, and then Wawel, the polish pastry shop, and Première Moisson, the best bakery in town, and so on...

    There's even a book store selling only books about food and cooking!

    Your wallet gets lighter and your love handles get bigger!!! :D

    Hugs
    Jon

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  5. GORGEOUS!

    Mary in Oregon

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  6. What a beautiful display! Kind of inhibits buying anything and making a gap! Pauline (as Pauline!)

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  7. What beautiful colors! You could take a picture of cement and somehow it would be beautiful.

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  8. C'est rigolo ces légumes et fruits dans des emballages individuels. Par contre pas très écologique, à part si les clients rapportent les emballages ? Est-ce une pratique courante sur les marchés canadiens ?

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    Replies
    1. @Olivier: Habituellement nous choisissons un panier et puis le marchant transverse le contenu du panier dans un sac (recyclable!) et il garde le panier. Voilà! :)

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  9. Walt, Fabulous, mouth watering photos.
    Our younger son is living in Montreal and has spoken of how good this market is.
    BUT he eats bucket loads of frozen broccoli because it's cheap! *sigh*
    Sue

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  10. ot only are tthe pictures great, but he prices are pretty good, too!

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  11. Great photos, Walt. I liked your comment on the Mexican "Italian" plum tomatoes...Globalization at its best.
    Your photo's caption reminded me of the recent flap over the "California Blend Vegetables" sold (at a dear price) by Whole Foods. Turns out that the product is imported from China.

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  12. tim, I think I prefer the price per kilo (or other unit weight). It makes comparisons easier.

    simon, but they taste so good...

    judy, they were so pretty I couldn't take a bad picture.

    jon, I agree. And I went into that bookstore for a short minute (looking for postcards of which there were none). There sure were a lot of food books!

    mary, it was like that everywhere we turned.

    pauline, I think the vendors just replace it as soon as it's bought.

    bill, you should see my photos of paint drying. ;)

    olivier, vous avez la réponse grâce à Jon !

    sue, I like frozen broccoli, too! :)

    starman, the Canadian dollar is just about equal to the American dollar these days, so comparisons are easy.

    dean, as long as they're honest about where they're from (without me having to search the fine print), I'm ok with it.

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