Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Another moth crane fly

I think this is called a plume moth, but I'm not sure (Update: fellow blogger Tim identifies it as a crane fly. Thanks Tim!). I saw it clinging to this grass plant seed head early one dewy morning out in the vineyard.

I don't know these well enough to identify all the bits and pieces, like the curly bits behind the moth. Is there more than one insect here?

My cold is a little better. I'm sleeping, although I wake up periodically to cough. But the sinuses are beginning to clear, and that's a good thing. Luckily, I suppose, this cold is coinciding with lousy outdoor weather, so I'm not missing out on getting chores done because of it.

6 comments:

  1. Magnificent capture... with all the dew drops,Walt...
    but...
    ... it is a fly, not a moth.

    A Crane Fly in fact...
    also called a Daddy Long-legs...
    Susan will give all the scientific data, I expect.

    He [it is a male] is either dead...
    or, more likely, clinging on for dear life...
    he's got his legs wrapped right around the Holcus grass seed head...
    I've never spotted this before...
    lovely.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I think it's Tipula paludosa.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I'll enter yesterday's comments here, since I tried two or three times yesterday but there was no way I could sign in.
    The photo was very serene and peaceful to me. I loved the variant greys you captured; I was tempted to get out my watercolors and attempt a likeness, but I had a list of things to do and I never got to it!
    Surely you saw those two turquoise spots of sky that I could imagine were there to remind the viewer that grey skies would eventually clear ... when was not exactly in the clouds!!!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Today's photo at first glance resembled a twisted coathanger!
    Please, somebody tell us the correct name for those "curly bits" - they are intriguing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are its antennae and tarsi (feet). They have extraordinarily long legs and like Tim says, it's hugging the grass seedhead, either dead or cold.

      Delete
  5. tim, merci!

    susan, I looked it up and it looks right. Especially the thorax.

    mary, sorry about that. I think it's beyond my control, unfortunately.

    ReplyDelete

Pour your heart out! I'm listening.