Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Pinces à linge

One of our neighbors keeps her clothespins in this little teapot-shaped basket. I only recently noticed it while walking around her yard with Callie. It obviously hangs outside year-round and I have no idea how long it's been there.

Clothespins in a teapot. No room for tempests.

Our own clothespins hang off the line in a plastic basket that's found in most supermarkets. Ken brings the basket inside during the winter months because he uses the clothespins to hang laundry on our indoor line. They probably last longer for not being exposed to the frost and snow.


  1. Most of the clothes pegs we first got for our little French house have broken this year, the plastic part just split. They lasted five years, which is probably good value.
    The strange thing is, we keep them indoors most of the time but the very same pegs from the same shop last years longer here in the UK, even though they live outdoors (but under cover).
    I wonder why............

  2. I bought some clothes pegs in Spain, not having a word of Spanish except "cerveza". I mimed pegging the washing on the line. Instant communication! All good phrasebooks should have the word for "clothespeg" on page 1. They have so many uses! P.

  3. I like that rustic clothes pin teapot basket.

  4. Walt,
    We used to hang our clothes out at our house in Pennsylvania. Such a nice fresh smell even though we had the occasional bird poop on a T-shirt or underwear. Now it's the clothes dryer all the time, not permitted to hang clothes outside in our proper development.


  5. Just yesterday I was informed on another blog that the 'pegs' as listed on a craft blog were actually (trans. = americanspeak!) clothespins!
    Now, today, I hear it again !

    I'm with you, Virginia, that teapot basket is darkling and it would be fun to keep my clothes pins/pegs in if only I had sunshine and a clothesline on my property...

  6. no room for tea either in that basket...

  7. Clever looking and so natural.

  8. Jean, maybe the plastic clothespins deteriorate faster in France because the summer sun is stronger. I bring ours in for the winter not to make the plastic parts last longer but to keep the metal parts from rusting so much.


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