Sunday, November 09, 2014

Notre-Dame de Montréal

The collégiale church in Montréal (Yonne) was built in the twelfth century as the romanesque architectural style was transitioning into the gothic style. The church now dominates the high point of the town, but when it was constructed, it stood inside the walls of the château compound. Not much remains of the château today.

I couldn't get far enough away to get the whole building in a shot without the wide angle lens. This photo works better in sepia than in color.

But the church is still there and it has had a few renovations since the late nineteenth century. Each of the building's four gable ends is adorned with a sculpted cross. The one in the photo below is on the west front above the church's main entrance.

The cross on the western gable end. I don't know why the window is set off-center.

The main doors are impressive and are quite wide for a church of this size. I read that the wrought iron decorative hinges are original to the twelfth century. What I read didn't say whether the doors themselves are original, so I assume they're not.

The main portal, with original iron work on the doors. The sculptures that once occupied the space above the doors (just out of the photo) were destroyed during the French Revolution.


6 comments:

  1. Those are really nice shots. That eccentric window is interesting since old chruches are so typically symmetric.

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  2. so impressive church with long long history.....masterpiece of mankind..

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  3. you have to wonder how long it took to build/decorate these structures without 21st century tools/methods. but it's clever that, using 12th century methods, a thing of beauty was created.

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  4. Hi after a long time! Husband Thierry was born in Auxerre and last year, I spent a nice few days in Sens for a work-related event. Gorgeous architecture in the area.

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  5. stuart, it's funny, I didn't even notice it was off center until I saw the photo.

    gosia, :)

    anne marie, according to what I read, it took somewhat less than 50 years to build.

    t.b., yes!

    betty, welcome back! I saw your recent blog post. :)

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