Sunday, May 31, 2015

Loose gravel

They're called gravillons in French, loose gravel on the road that cars can kick up or, worse, lose traction on. Normally you'd see this temporary sign when a road has been oiled and resurfaced with fresh gravel, but I don't think this one has. I didn't notice any loose gravel at all.

I like how the sign is taped onto the post.

Saturday was a productive day garden-wise. I got thirty-one tomato plants in the ground. I have ten left over that I'm keeping until I see how much room there is. The summer and winter squashes still have to be planted; I may do that today depending on the weather. Then there are the eggplant and peppers and I want to plant a row of green beans.

9 comments:

  1. When I'm gardening I like to read about other people's gardens. When I'm not gardening, I still like to read about other people's gardens.

    I should get out in my own garden right now! Have fun, Walt.

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  2. Whew, makes me want to go out to see what is going on in may garden!

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  3. Called Eggplant in Australia too.

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  4. Have tried to send e-mail but can't get it to send on the internet connection in this crazy hotel in Mortagne.

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  5. Tape on the post: Système D!

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  6. Irrelevant footnote: in the UK, the sign would often say "Loose Chippings". Some people think that's the name of a village that magically moves around the country.

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  7. Oh my! I remember my French teacher calling her students gravillons

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  8. Sometimes we see a row of signs like this one by a perfectly normal stretch of road. Nothing seems to happen for quite a long time then mysteriously they go away. We have concluded that it means the shed where they keep all the signs is being painted. Pauline and Tim

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