Wednesday, July 23, 2014

The garden in late July

The vegetable garden is progressing. We have lots of little green tomatoes, some zucchini and winter squash are forming, and one row of green beans is forming blossoms. The corn is not very tall (I'm not sure how tall this variety is supposed to get) but I can see tassels starting to form.

A wide view of the four square garden plus the long strip of tomatoes (on the left). We have 32 tomato plants in all, plus 2 volunteers.

The cucumbers have sent out tendrils and I'm training them up the tee-pee like structure you see in the pictures. That's the "cucumber tree." Under it is a crop of coriander (cilantro) that's getting ready to go to seed. We use the coriander leaves (called cilantro in the US) in Asian and Mexican dishes and we also use the seeds in other cooking. Plus, the seeds can be planted again next year (there are always too many to use).

Another angle. You can see the corn sticking up in the back.

Otherwise, the surviving aubergine (eggplant) plants are looking good and the warm weather has given a boost to the scrawny bell peppers. Time will tell if they will produce anything. So that's the state of the garden as we move toward August.

8 comments:

  1. looks good, walt; you should be proud!

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  2. It looks great. All that work is paying off.

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  3. Hope you get a good crop. It looks great.

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  4. Sure looks great :)
    I wonder what the optimum temperature and soil are for bell peppers... we grew some a couple of years ago and the peppers were just really small and the plants didn't do much. I haven't researched it at all.

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  5. Looks like you're going to have a very busy time harvesting and eating all those vegetables. I'll have your leftovers! ;-)

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  6. The garden is neat and well-organised. Definitely you have green fingers.

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  7. You should be getting little pods on your English pole beans by now - this wet weather suits runner beans really well. Don't worry if the first few don't set, they never do. We've just eaten our first pick, but that was from some plants that overwintered under the soil and are now in their second year. They started flowering three weeks ago. On hot days I mist the flowers with a sprayer. Everything looks so green and healthy in your garden, you've put a lot into it and soon you'll be reaping the rewards!

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  8. I'm most interested in seeing how your tee-pee cukes develop. They're off to a good start!

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